Did you see Amanda Cohen's Article on Eater?

Did you see Amanda Cohen's Article on Eater?


Do you ever feel like there is an 'us vs. them' mentality between restaurant staff and guests? New York City chef and restaurant owner Amanda Cohen recently set out to dispel this myth in a guest editorial on Eater, after her restaurant received a one-star review on Yelp from a guest who did not even dine there.

Amanda's restaurant, Dirt Candy, occupied a very small space of only 18 seats in Manhattan's East Village—they're in the process of moving to a larger space next month. With limited capacity and high demand (Dirt Candy is one of the only Michelin-recommended vegetarian restaurants in America), the restaurant regularly booked up months in advance.

In the article, Amanda tells the story of the misunderstanding she had with customer "Gerard M." regarding Dirt Candy's reservation policy. After a miscommunication over the phone, Gerard believed that the restaurant only took walk-ins when in all actuality, walk-ins were on a first-come, first-served basis and extremely hard to come by. 

"So Gerard and his lovely girlfriend came down. When they arrived, he was shocked to see no line and a full restaurant. This was not what he thought I'd said on the phone. Upset, Gerard spoke with one of my waiters who told him that most people do make reservations and walk-ins are a crap shoot. Depressed, he decided we were a bunch of liars who had tricked him."
-Chef Amanda Cohen

Amanda explains that this situation with Gerard, who went on to leave a scathing review on Yelp, is not unique. She believes the restaurant business has become infected with a toxic mistrust between those who work in restaurants and those who dine in them. She reminds readers that restaurants and patrons both have the same goal—for you to enjoy your dining experience—and suggests that the solution is to have an open dialogue of communication with the restaurants you frequent.

"There has to be more trust between those of us who work in restaurants, and those of us who eat in them. When I ask if you enjoyed your meal, it's not a pleasantry. I genuinely want to know, because if you're not happy I want to fix it. When your server asks if you have questions about the menu, it's a real question. This is her job. If you don't like the guy pouring water every five minutes, ask him to stop. Chances are his telepathic ability to gauge your hydration levels are on the fritz that night."
-Chef Amanda Cohen

Amanda's thought-provoking perspective illuminates a growing issue, particularly in the age of social media. At George's, it is our top priority to deliver an exceptional dining experience to each and every guest. So if your dining experience is anything less, please let us know during your visit so that we may have the opportunity to help you. We're in the business to make our guests happy—and that includes every meal.

Here is the article if you would like to read it in its entirety: Amanda Cohen Breaks Down the 'Us VS. Them' Mentality in Restaurants

What do you think? Share your thoughts in the comments below.